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Pariah Parties: Established Parties’ Systematic Boycotting of Other Parties

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Part of the Political Campaigning and Communication book series (PCC)

Abstract

This chapter is about established parties boycotting a particular other party. The systematic refusal to politically cooperate in any way with a party is defined as “ostracising” that party. After elaborating on the concept of ostracism and theory underlying it, previous work is discussed as well as empirical examples. This chapter proceeds by categorising 13 anti-immigration parties and 15 communist parties in 15 West European countries as either “ostracised” or “non-ostracised.” Finally, possible electoral effects are theorised about and a “pariah hypothesis” is introduced to the reader.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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