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Training Institutes

  • Adrian Robert BazbauersEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

In this chapter, Bazbauers addresses the courses of the Economic Development Institute (EDI) and World Bank Institute (WBI). The ‘teaching and learning arm’ of the World Bank, the institutes deliver training courses to a range of actors. The chapter provides a significant analysis for it comments not only on how the World Bank transfers ideas and practices, but how it directly trains individuals in governments, the private sector, and civil society to accept and adopt particular development understandings. The chapter also evaluates the online engagement of the World Bank e-Institute, an Internet-based platform that delivers wholly online courses. In doing so, the chapter analyses changes in EDI and WBI curricula, pedagogy, and methodology in their attempts to socialise participants into accepting their policy norms.

Keywords

Policy Norms Online Engagement International Training Institute Participating Member Countries Sprite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Government and PolicyUniversity of CanberraBruceAustralia

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