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Survey Missions

  • Adrian Robert BazbauersEmail author
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Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

In Chapter 6, Bazbauers turns to a ‘background’ example of technical assistance: survey missions, which include any activity involved in measuring the development status of a developing country. Their importance is that they have informed World Bank lending schedules since the 1940s and comprise an important dialogue between the World Bank and its member countries. Starting with general survey missions introduced in 1949, the chapter evaluates how survey missions evolved across the decades, addressing Country Assistance Strategies, Economic and Sector Work, and the 2014 launch of Country Partnership Frameworks. They are relevant to policy movement analyses because they are used to raise recipient capacity and help the World Bank plan and implement development programs, building dialogue and partnerships with recipients on how ‘best’ to develop.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Government and PolicyUniversity of CanberraBruceAustralia

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