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The World Bank

  • Adrian Robert BazbauersEmail author
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Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

In this chapter, Bazbauers provides a historical framing of the World Bank from 1946–2016. Three broad eras of development history divide the chapter: the Bretton Woods era, the Washington Consensus era, and the post-Washington Consensus era. In order to relate these eras to the World Bank, each era is sub-divided into World Bank presidencies. The Bretton Woods era (1940s–1970s) critiques the presidencies of Eugene Meyer, John McCloy, Eugene Robert Black, George Woods, and Robert McNamara. The Washington Consensus era (1980s and 1990s) reviews the presidencies of Alden Winship Clausen, Barber Conable, and Lewis Preston. And the post-Washington Consensus era (2000s to present) analyses the presidencies of James Wolfensohn, Paul Wolfowitz, Robert Zoellick, and Jim Yong Kim.

Keywords

World Bank President Wolfensohn post-Washington Consensus International Bank For Reconstruction And Development (IBRD) Organization Of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Government and PolicyUniversity of CanberraBruceAustralia

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