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TXT-tool 3.081-1.8: A New High-Stress Undrained Ring-Shear Apparatus and Its Application to the 1792 Unzen–Mayuyama Megaslide in Japan

  • Khang Dang
  • Kyoji Sassa
  • Bin He
  • Kaoru Takara
  • Kimio Inoue
  • Osamu Nagai
Chapter

Abstract

Sassa and others in the International Consortium on Landslides (ICL) have developed a new series of undrained ring-shear apparatus (ICL-1 and ICL-2) for two projects of the International Programme on Landslides (IPL-161 and IPL-175). Both projects are supported by the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development Program (SATREPS) of Japan. ICL-1 was developed to create a compact and transportable apparatus for practical use in Croatia; one set was donated to Croatia in 2012. ICL-2 was developed in 2012–2013 to simulate the initiation and motion of megaslides of more than 100 m in thickness. The successful undrained capacity of ICL-2 is 3 MPa. This apparatus was used to simulate possible conditions for the initiation and motion of the 1792 Unzen–Mayuyama megaslide (volume, 3.4 × 108 m3; maximum depth, 400 m) triggered by an earthquake. The megaslide and resulting tsunami killed about 15,000 people. Samples were taken from the source area (for initiation) and the moving area (for motion). The hazard area was estimated by the integrated landslide simulation model LS-RAPID, using parameters obtained with the ICL-2 undrained ring-shear apparatus.

Keywords

Landslide Undrained ring-shear apparatus Unzen Mayuyama 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Khang Dang
    • 1
  • Kyoji Sassa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bin He
    • 3
  • Kaoru Takara
    • 4
  • Kimio Inoue
    • 5
  • Osamu Nagai
    • 1
  1. 1.International Consortium on LandslidesKyotoJapan
  2. 2.VNU University of ScienceHanoiVietnam
  3. 3.CAS Key Laboratory of Watershed Geographic SciencesNanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)NanjingChina
  4. 4.Disaster Prevention Research InstituteKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  5. 5.Sabo Frontier FoundationTokyoJapan

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