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Reinterpreting the Hierarchy and Finding New Perspectives

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Abstract

This chapter denies the authority of the discourse that African immigrants are a problem, which gives way to new views on the threatening other and what is not said about African immigrants. In this way, interviews with the African immigrant and South African traders in the Johannesburg inner city necessarily included rebel voices, which troubled the dominant discourse that African immigrants are the threatening other. Based on this, this book is re-authoring the prevailing discourse, to include suppressed, marginalised or excluded views about African immigrants. This reinterpretation of the hierarchy is the deconstruction of the threatening other through in-depth interviews with the people who are actively involved in the scene—African immigrant traders and their South African counterparts.

Keywords

African immigrant traders Deconstruction Johannesburg inner city Threatening other South Africa 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geography and Environmental StudiesUniversity of ZululandKwaDlangezwaSouth Africa

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