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Return to the Source: A Balinese Pilgrimage to India and the Re-Enchantment of Agama Hindu in Global Modernity

  • Annette Hornbacher
Chapter

Abstract

Indonesian politics supports religious pluralism only in terms of a modern paradigm of religion as a consistent monotheist doctrine and world religion. The Balinese had therefore to interpret their local traditions of animist and ancestor worship in terms of a doctrinal reform Hinduism (agama Hindu), which replaces traditions of immanent worship with a universal and transcendent religious truth. This chapter describes the journey of a group of Balinese to India as the source of their religion, and it analyzes how an official pilgrimage tour (tirtha yatra) organized to support the agenda of agama Hindu was dialectically transformed by the pilgrims into a performative reappropriation of Balinese animist ontology.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annette Hornbacher
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für EthnologieHeidelberg UniversityHeidelbergGermany

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