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Coastal Wetland Restoration: Concepts, Methodology, and Application Areas Along the Indian Coast

  • Ramasamy ManivananEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Coastal Research Library book series (COASTALRL, volume 21)

Abstract

This paper emphasizes and endorses the use of natural restoration techniques for Coastal Wetland Restoration in Indian scenario. Natural techniques that restore an ecosystem’s ability to approach a pre-disturbance condition are distinct from treatment technologies or structures that are inserted into the system to be acquired sustainable equilibrium. Natural restoration techniques use materials indigenous to the ecosystem and are incorporated into the dynamics of an coastal ecosystem in an attempt to create conditions in which coastal ecosystem processes can withstand and diminish the impact of stressors on the coastal environment. In Chilika wetland ecosystem, the salinity is restored due to open cut of the sand bar and entered much volume of sea water and increased the salinity concentration in the wetland. Subsequently, the fish population increased in the Chilika wetland ecosystem. Similarly, Vembanad wetland ecosystem, also restored the fisheries population by operating the gates of the weirs in the region.

Keywords

Coastal wetland restoration Chilka wetland Vembanad wetland Coastal| Dynamics Salinity Fisheries Restoration technology 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mathematical Modeling for Coastal Engineering (MMCE), Central Water and Power Research StationKhadakwaslaIndia

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