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Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

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Abstract

The term stereotactic implies that the target is localized relative to a fixed three-dimensional spatial coordinate system. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is defined as giving a high dose of radiation per fraction, in up to five fractions, using sophisticated image guidance to deliver a potent ablative dose to cancerous tissues while minimizing the risk to normal structures. The alpha-beta ratios for the rectum and bladder, both of which are late-responding tissues, are 2.5–5 Gy and 3–7 Gy, respectively. This unique biologic nature of prostate cancer explains the therapeutic gain with hypofractionation. These radiobiologic assumptions were supported by prospective randomized trials that used 2.5–3.1 Gy per fraction.

Keywords

  • Stereotactic body radiotherapy
  • Prostate cancer
  • Robotic radiosurgery

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-56114-1_18
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Correspondence to Fadil Akyol M.D. .

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Akyol, F., Yazici, G., Gultekin, M., Hurmuz, P., Sari, S.Y., Ozyigit, G. (2017). Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer. In: Ozyigit, G., Selek, U. (eds) Principles and Practice of Urooncology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56114-1_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56114-1_18

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