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Statistical Inference for the Center of a Population

  • Douglas A. Wolfe
  • Grant Schneider
Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Statistics book series (STS)

Abstract

In this chapter we consider the commonly encountered statistical problem of using sample data for a quantitative variable along with the sampling distribution of an appropriate summary statistic to make inferences about the center of the corresponding population distribution. For example, Sciulli and Carlisle (1975) used skeletal remains to obtain sample data on the stature of a number of prehistoric Amerindian populations living in the Ohio Valley over the years from 200 BC to 1200 AD. A number of questions naturally arose in this study. What was the typical height for male and female Amerindians living in this region of the country during that period of time? As the degree of plant cultivation increased and the reliance on the availability or scarcity of fresh game decreased over the years, was there a noticeable change in the stature of the Amerindian populations? Questions such as these can be addressed only through the use of appropriate statistical techniques.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas A. Wolfe
    • 1
  • Grant Schneider
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of StatisticsThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Upstart NetworkSan CarlosUSA

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