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Exploratory Data Analysis: Observing Patterns and Departures from Patterns

  • Douglas A. Wolfe
  • Grant Schneider
Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Statistics book series (STS)

Abstract

Data, data, everywhere and we are forced to look at it. We see it in the newspapers (“63% of the people polled support the president’s decision to… ”), on the news (“scientists at a major research university report that treatment of Parkinson’s disease with a combination of drugs A and B has the potential to extend remission of the disease by an average of 2 years…”), from the government (“the nation’s trade deficit narrowed last month, for the first time in… ”), in sports (“over the past two years left-handed hitters have a batting average of .359 against … ”), in finance (“the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose again today to a new record high, marking the seventh consecutive day of record highs, but the broader market…”), and social settings (“despite the robust economy, the percentage of families living below the poverty line has not dropped substantially over the past six months…”), just to scratch the surface.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas A. Wolfe
    • 1
  • Grant Schneider
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of StatisticsThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Upstart NetworkSan CarlosUSA

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