Emotion Studies: Darwin, James and Freud

Chapter

Abstract

It was Ekman (Emotions revealed, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2007) who re-discovered the work of Darwin as a contribution to emotion studies. He expanded the area of research to produce a facial coding system of emotions and was engaged in a historic dialogue with The Dalai Lama on Buddhist pathways for managing negative emotions . Darwin’s classic work, The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals, has remained one of the classics of all time and the legacy was received by William James who inherited a strong Darwinian flavour in his revolutionary analysis of emotions. Darwin’s thesis on emotions was the product of an evolutionary perspective, and the book was on animal behaviour. Sigmund Freud’s contribution, in contrast, is described as an ideogenic revolution as different from a somatic perspective.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Philosophical, Historical and International StudiesMonash UniversitySpringvaleAustralia

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