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Southern Paths for Learned Travellers: The Discovery of Herculaneum and of the Neoclassical Mediterranean

  • Manuela D’AmoreEmail author
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Part of the Italian and Italian American Studies book series (IIAS)

Abstract

This is the core chapter of the book. It historically refers to the period 1739–1780, and it sheds light both on the politico-cultural process leading to the discovery of the buried Roman city of Herculaneum (1738) and on the Fellows’ growing attraction to the Bourbon Kingdom of Naples. Textually based on the letters that the Fellows accepted to publish, and informing the reader about the Transactions’ exceptional contributors—in this period, Camillo Paderni (ca. 1715–1781) in particular—Chap.  4 is complete with a histogram and a table showing that in the decades 1739–1760 cultural communication was related to the huge archaeological area, which resulted in a growing number of English visitors in the region of Campania, and in the beginning of a new evolutionary phase in the Grand Tour of Italy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CataniaCataniaItaly

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