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Realization Theory for Linear Dynamical Quantum Systems

  • Hendra I. NurdinEmail author
  • Naoki Yamamoto
Chapter
  • 718 Downloads
Part of the Communications and Control Engineering book series (CCE)

Abstract

This chapter presents a realization/network synthesis theory for linear quantum systems. This theory addresses the question of how one can go from an abstract description of a linear quantum system to a concrete realization of the system using quantum optical devices. Two distinct types of realization problems are introduced and treated: the strict (or hard) realization problem and the transfer function (or soft) realization problem. The system to be realized is decomposed into simpler subsystems, and how these subsystems can be realized, at least approximately, in the quantum optical setting is developed. In particular, it is shown that simpler realizations can be obtained for completely passive linear quantum systems.

Keywords

Model Matrix Beam Splitter Pump Beam Cavity Mode Internal Edge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Electrical Engineering and TelecommunicationsUNSW AustraliaSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Applied Physics and Physico-InformaticsKeio UniversityYokohamaJapan

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