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The Critically Ill Female Patient

  • Susanna PriceEmail author
  • Shahana Uddin
Chapter

Abstract

Differential outcomes are present among female and male patients with critical illness, related to co-morbidity, immune response, pharmacology and the underlying physiological response to intensive care and its complications. Women are more susceptible to the effects of neuromuscular blockade, opioid receptor agonists, and beta adrenergic agents and they are more likely to develop Torsade de pointes and liver dysfunction in response to pharmacological agents. Elderly female patients with basal septal hypertrophy may respond to dobutamine by developing worsening of diastolic dysfunction and increasing left-ventricular outflow tract obstruction. There are important differences in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) between genders, with women at risk for markedly worse psychological outcomes after critical illness.

Keywords

Beta-blockers Critical illness Diastolic dysfunction Dobutamine Estrogen Extracorporeal cardiac support Immune response Immunomodulation Inflammation Intensive care Pharmacokinetics Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Pregnancy Sex-hormones Sepsis Torsade de pointes (TdP) Trauma 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Royal Brompton Hospital, Imperial CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.Anaesthetist and Major Trauma, King’s College HospitalLondonUK

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