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Conventional Forces Norm

  • Christopher Spearin
Chapter
Part of the New Security Challenges book series (NSECH)

Abstract

Chapter 2 identifies the components of the conventional forces norm that set what states do and consequently helps to define the commercial and operational limitations of PMSCs. It offers a background presentation of norm characteristics and their importance in order for the reader to realize specifically what states, as members of a club, should possess militarily. At play are both the perceived instrumentality of technology and the desire for prestige amongst states. In a related manner, also evident here is the increasing importance of machines rather than labour in the application of violence. This chapter builds on this by revealing the trend of capital/machines both compensating for reduced human involvement and protecting those human beings – military personnel – that are in harm’s way. The chapter concludes that the conventional forces norm and its associated trends are not likely to go away quickly. Militaries are unlikely to become more labour-intensive in terms of the application of violence (as opposed to supporting the machines used to apply violence).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Spearin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Defence StudiesRoyal Military College of Canada/Canadian Forces CollegeTorontoCanada

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