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Aspirin Endures

  • Steven M. RooneyEmail author
  • J. N. Campbell
Chapter
  • 944 Downloads
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

During the 1980s, after three decades of research, hundreds of different trials, and many successes and failures, aspirin as antidote to heart related issues was not statistically viable. In the eyes of the federal government, which had monitored the pharmaceutical market in some form or fashion since the Wilson Administration, there still was not enough evidence. All of this changed, when a relatively new technique called meta-analysis that was developed by a statistician, named Dr. Richard Peto, convinced the FDA and most of the cynics that the aspirin research was sound (Mann and Plummer in The aspirin wars: money, medicine, and 100 years of rampant competition. Knopf, New York, pp 318–320, 1991; Jeffreys in Aspirin: the remarkable story of a wonder drug. Bloomsbury, London, p 272, 2004). Now it was up to the FTC to try and curb the claims that were now being published in every newspaper, magazine, on the television, and eventually on the Internet. Finally, aspirin’s role as a preventive medication, which was supported by the majority of the medical community, had arrived.

Keywords

Heart Attack Pharmaceutical Market Major League Baseball Heart Health Restricting Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Independent ScholarIrvingUSA
  2. 2.Independent ScholarSpringUSA

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