Advertisement

The Criminal Justice System in Transition: Assisting Victims of Crime

  • Peter C. Kratcoski
Chapter

Abstract

The movement to call attention to and assist victims of crime in the United States was closely tied in with other movements such as the civil rights movement and women’s movement. Until the 1950s, the victims of crime were chiefly viewed in terms of being witnesses for the prosecution who were called to testify against persons charged with crimes against them. As the mass media drew attention to the inequalities of the justice system, the needs of minorities, women, and victims drawn into the system received more attention. Federal legislation passed in the 1970s provided funding for the establishment of victim services agencies. Gradually, state legislators enacted laws that benefited victims of crime in terms of offering compensation and other types of assistance to those physically or materially harmed by criminal activity. The justice system followed suit by involving the victims in the judicial component through victim impact statements and creating dispositions that would protect the victims from future victimization by convicted offenders.

Keywords

Victim services agencies Victim advocacy Women’s shelters Victims of crime Community service organizations Mediation Community correctional facilities Victim services unit Victim impact statements Victim compensation 

References

  1. Boda, J. (2016). Prologue. In P. Kratcoski & M. Edelbacher (Eds.), Collaborative policing: Police, academics, professionals, and communities working together for education, training and program implementation (pp. xxv–xxxix). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor and Francis Group.Google Scholar
  2. Crowley, J. (2009). History of victimology, 1960s and 1970s. In J. Wilson (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of victimology (pp. 117–122). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
  3. Dallas County Supervision and Corrections Department. (2016). Retrieved October 15, 2016, from http://www.dallascounty.org/department/csc/programs.php
  4. Hazelwood, R., & Burgess, A. (Eds.). (2008). Practical aspects of rape investigations: A multidisciplinary approach (4th ed.). New York: CRC Press.Google Scholar
  5. Jerin, R. (2009). History of victimology, pre-1940s. In J. Wilson (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of victimology (pp. 108–111). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
  6. Kratcoski, P. (2009). History of victimology, 1950s. In J. Wilson (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of victimology (pp. 113–116). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
  7. Kratcoski, P. (2016). Perspectives on the professional practitioner in criminal justice. In P. Kratcoski & M. Edelbacher (Eds.), Collaborative policing: Police, academic, professionals, and communities working together for education, training, and program implementation (pp. 247–291). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor and Francis Group.Google Scholar
  8. Kratcoski, P., & Edelbacher, M. (2016). Trends in the criminality and victimization of the elderly. Federal Probation, 80, 58–63.Google Scholar
  9. Mason, B., & Morgan, R. (2013). Crimes against the elderly (age 65 and older) for the years 2003 to 2013. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics.Google Scholar
  10. McGee, C. (1997). Family drug court: Another permanency perspective. Juvenile and Family Court Journal, 48(4), 65–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Milne, B., & Bull, R. (2007). Interviewing victims of crime, including children and people with intellectual disabilities. In B. Milne & R. Bull (Eds.), Investigative interviewing: Psychology and practice (pp. 9–24). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  12. National Crime Prevention Council. (2015). Strategies: Crime prevention services for the elderly (pp. 1–3). Retrieved July 10, 2016, from http://www.Nij.gov/topics/crime/elder-abuse/pages/welcome.aspx
  13. National Institute of Justice. (2015). Elder abuse. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice.Google Scholar
  14. Ohio Association of County Boards of Development. (2016). Retrieved September 15, 2016, from www.oacbdd.org
  15. Philips, T. (2009). History of victimology, 1980s. In J. Wilson (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of victimology (pp. 193–198). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
  16. Rich, K. (2016). Best practices for addressing rape: Police collaboration with victim advocates. In P. Kratcoski & M. Edelbacher (Eds.), Collaborative policing: Police, academics, professionals, and communities working together for education, training, and program implementation (pp. 229–246). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor and Francis Group.Google Scholar
  17. Rich, K., & Seffrin, P. (2013). Police officers collaboration with victim advocates: Barriers and facilitators. Violence and Victims, 28, 223–237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Stark County Prosecutor. (2016). Retrieved February 15, 2016, from http://www.starkcountyohio.gov/prosecutor
  19. Sullivan, E., Mino, M., Nelson, K., & Pope, J. (2002). Families as a resource in recovery from drug abuse: An evaluation of the La bodega de la Familia. New York: Vera Institute of Justice.Google Scholar
  20. Summit County Victim Assistance Program. (2014). General brochure (p. 1). Retrieved July 8, 2014, from http://www.victimassistanceprogram.org/eddia/1019/vap2014generalbrocure.pdf.page1
  21. Sutherland, E. (1924). Criminology. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott.Google Scholar
  22. Travis, J. (2005). Families and children. Federal Probation, 69, 31–42.Google Scholar
  23. Walshe, S. (2015). Justice house: The program that’s keeping women out of prison and saving money. Washington, DC: Womens’ Prison Association. Retrieved July 10, 2016, from https://www.Theguardian.com/us-new-12015/sep/17/justice-home-program-keeping-women-out-of-prison-saving-money
  24. Weintraub, J. (1976). The delivery of services to families of prisoners. Federal Probation, 40(4), 28–31.Google Scholar
  25. Wilson, J. (2009). Federal Victim and witness protection act of 1982; victims of crime act of 1984. In The Praeger handbook of victimology (p. x). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
  26. Women’s Shelters. (2016). Transitional housing. Retrieved February 17, 2016, from https://www.womenshelters.org

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter C. Kratcoski
    • 1
  1. 1.Kent State UniversityKentUSA

Personalised recommendations