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Trial by a Many-Colored Flame: A Multi-disciplinary, Community-Centric Approach to Digital Media and Computing Education

  • Adrienne DeckerEmail author
  • Andrew Phelps
  • Christopher A. Egert
Chapter

Abstract

Computing is currently overwhelmed by barriers to engagement and efficacy and suffers from a lack of diversity in participation. The field, while being substantially creative often distances itself from its artistic underpinnings. At the same time, those who view the field as a strictly technical endeavor often struggle in advanced software design. Through the use of game-based projects in a production studio course, this chapter explores two case examples that seek to challenge these notions. The course directly engages students in experiential, focused work that illustrates the field as a combination of creative practice and technical implementation. Students approached many of the activities in production studio through lenses that attempted clear-cut divisions between design, art, and development. Our challenge was to show the strength of blurring these lines in creating a quality production-level product. This chapter explores successes and challenges of this approach over successive offerings.

Keywords

Computer games Games education Computer art Creative computing Studio courses Constructionist learning Interdisciplinary Capstone 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the following contributors to the past two iterations of Production Studio, Aaron Cloutier, who served as creative consultant, Jennifer Hinton, Assistant Director of the MAGIC Center, and Christopher Cascioli, IGM Faculty. Further, we need to recognize those who gave feedback on prototypes and builds of the projects throughout the semesters, Anna Sweet and William Destler.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Interactive Games and MediaRochesterUSA
  2. 2.The RIT Center for Media Arts, Games, Interaction and Creativity (MAGIC)RochesterUSA

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