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Acquiring and Teaching Chinese Pronunciation

  • Hana TřískováEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the Educational Linguistics book series (EDUL, volume 31)

Abstract

The author explores the specifics of learning/teaching Standard Chinese (SC) pronunciation, its goals and methods, within the broader context of L2 pronunciation learning/teaching. The ways in which research findings in Chinese phonetics and phonology might facilitate the acquisition of SC pronunciation by adult learners are investigated. An overview is provided of the textbooks and linguistic literature dealing with SC pronunciation. The usefulness of metalinguistic instruction is discussed. The following topics, among others, are addressed: the SC syllable structure, the third tone, acoustic correlates of stress, and the importance of unstressed function words.

Keywords

Pronunciation Learning textbooksTextbooks Pinyin Form-focused Instruction (FFI) toneTone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of East AsiaThe Oriental Institute, Czech Academy of SciencesPraha 8Czech Republic

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