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Analysis of the Predisposing Factors for Different Landslide Types Using the Generalized Additive Model

  • Carlotta BartellettiEmail author
  • Roberto Giannecchini
  • Giacomo D’Amato Avanzi
  • Yuri Galanti
  • Michele Barsanti
  • Maria Giuseppina Persichillo
  • Massimiliano Bordoni
  • Claudia Meisina
  • Andrea Cevasco
  • Jorge Pedro Galve Arnedo
Conference paper

Abstract

In this paper, a semi-parametric nonlinear regression technique, known as Generalized Additive Model (GAM), was implemented for the landslide susceptibility assessment in the Gravegnola catchment (Northern Apennines, Eastern Liguria, Italy), which was affected by more than 500 shallow landslides on the 25 October 2011 intense rainfall event. Twelve explanatory variables derived from DEM with 5-m resolution, river network, land use and geological maps were considered to investigate their influence on landslide type occurrence. The predictive performance of different combinations of explanatory variables has been evaluated through a cross-validation technique and ROC curve analysis. Different susceptibility maps for each landslide type were finally produced and the results were compared. The preliminary results show the higher ability of GAM than a single regression technique in selecting the most influent predisposing factors on the basis of the type of movement involved in landsliding.

Keywords

Rainfall-induced landslide Generalized additive model Predisposing factors Landslide types Northern apennines Italy 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlotta Bartelletti
    • 1
    Email author
  • Roberto Giannecchini
    • 1
  • Giacomo D’Amato Avanzi
    • 1
  • Yuri Galanti
    • 1
  • Michele Barsanti
    • 2
  • Maria Giuseppina Persichillo
    • 3
  • Massimiliano Bordoni
    • 3
  • Claudia Meisina
    • 3
  • Andrea Cevasco
    • 4
  • Jorge Pedro Galve Arnedo
    • 5
  1. 1.Earth Science DepartmentUniversity of PisaPisaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Industrial EngineeringUniversity of PisaPisaItaly
  3. 3.Department of Earth and Environmental SciencesUniversity of PaviaPaviaItaly
  4. 4.Department of Earth, Environment and Life SciencesUniversity of GenoaGenoaItaly
  5. 5.Department of GeodynamicsUniversidad de Granada, Campus Universitario FuentenuevaGranadaSpain

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