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Recent Developments in Measurement and Use of Fully Softened Shear Strength in the USA

  • Bernardo A. CastellanosEmail author
  • Thomas L. Brandon
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Series in Geomechanics and Geoengineering book series (SSGG)

Abstract

There has been a renewed emphasis in the U.S. on the use of fully softened shear strength for slope stability analysis of cuts in stiff clays and the stability of compacted clay embankments. A detailed investigation on the proper use and measurement of the fully softened shear strength has been recently undertaken, examining different test apparatuses and procedures. A summary of the recent development and guidelines on the use of this concept in slope stability analysis and the proper way to measure the fully softened shear strength in the laboratory is presented.

Keywords

Shear Strength Pore Pressure Direct Shear Liquid Limit Direct Shear Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Virginia TechBlacksburgUSA

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