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Midface Distraction: Orthodontic Considerations

  • Pradip R. ShetyeEmail author
  • Barry H. Grayson
Chapter

Abstract

Distraction osteogenesis has become an important clinical tool in craniofacial surgery. Initially applied to lengthening of the human mandible [1], the technique has subsequently been used to reconstruct all components of the craniofacial skeleton, including the maxilla, zygoma, and cranial vault. One of the most beneficial applications of distraction has been advancement of the midface in patients with cleft lip and palate, midface hypoplasia, and craniosynostosis syndromes.

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Distraction Osteogenesis Soft Tissue Change Anterior Nasal Spine Distraction Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wyss Department of Plastic SurgeryNYU Langone Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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