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Hemp and Calhoun’s “Cords”

  • Brian R. Pellar
Chapter
Part of the American Literature Readings in the 21st Century book series (ALTC)

Abstract

In this chapter, Pellar discusses how, instead of using the popular Ship of State motif, the pro-slavery Senator Calhoun used the motif of “cords” and “fabric” as a unifying image of the North and South. Pellar discusses how the “cord” imagery evoked not only the rigging of the “Ship of State” but also the very fabric of the pro-slavery Constitution itself. The dual metaphors of the “Ship of State” and “cords,” which Calhoun and the newspapers brilliantly exploited and repeated again and again for effect, did not fail to embed themselves fully in the attentive consciousness of the country. Pellar then discusses how Melville couldn’t help but utilizes these images in Moby-Dick.

Keywords

Unify Image Paper Fabric Canvas Ship Real Ship American Heritage Dictionary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Bibliography

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  2. Calhoun, John C., “Speech on the Oregon Bill.” June 27, 1848. The Online Library of Liberty. Reprint from, Union and Liberty: The Political Philosophy of John C. Calhoun. Edited by Ross M. Lence. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1992. http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/calhoun-union-and-liberty-the-political-philosophy-of-john-c-calhoun.Google Scholar
  3. Calhoun, John C., “Speech on the Admission of California – and the General State of the Union.” March 4, 1850. The Online Library of Liberty. Reprint from, Union and Liberty: The Political Philosophy of John C. Calhoun. Edited by Ross M. Lence. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1992. Http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/calhoun-union-and-liberty-the-political-philosophy-of-john-c-calhoun.Google Scholar
  4. Heimert, Alan, “Moby-Dick and American Political Symbolism.” American Quarterly 15 (Winter 1963): 498–534.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Johnston, Arthur. Myths and Facts of the American Revolution: A Commentary on United States History as it is Written. Toronto: William Briggs, 1908.Google Scholar
  6. Melville, Herman. Moby-Dick. 1851. Edited by Harrison Hayford and Hershel Parker. New York: W. W. Norton, 1967b. Page numbers are to the 1967 edition.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian R. Pellar
    • 1
  1. 1.BostonUSA

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