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Melville’s Motivations

  • Brian R. Pellar
Chapter
Part of the American Literature Readings in the 21st Century book series (ALTC)

Abstract

In this chapter, Pellar discusses the motivations and reasons behind Melville’s decision to use an allegory. Melville felt that it was necessary to employ the use of an allegory, as it would have been, among other things, scandalous and shameful given his close association with Chief Justice Shaw and others. Whether from personal motivations resulting from financial need, family loyalty and respect, or whether from a stronger and more appealing enlightened understanding for those deep divers of truth, or as the case may be, a combination of all of them, Pellar discusses how Melville chose to remain silent about the secret allegory in Moby-Dick.

Keywords

Short Story Slave Trade Republican Party Vague Idea Circle Round 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian R. Pellar
    • 1
  1. 1.BostonUSA

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