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Toward a Theory of Information Literacy: Information Science Meets Instructional Systems Design

  • Delia NeumanEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 676)

Abstract

This paper addresses the need for a comprehensive theory of information literacy by beginning to lay the groundwork for a theory that encompasses the use of information as well as its location and evaluation. First—drawing on research and theory from two fields grounded in complementary understandings of “information”—the theory posits that information literacy and learning are strongly related because information itself is the basic building block for human learning. Second, the paper discusses the importance of knowing how the characteristics of different information formats—visual, multisensory, and digital—can be used to support different kinds of learning. The paper concludes by arguing that students and others must understand these characteristics in order to be truly information literate—that is, to use information effectively to engage in deep and meaningful learning in the information-rich environment of the 21st century.

Keywords

Theory Information science Instructional systems design Learning Affordances 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Computing and InformaticsDrexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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