Advertisement

Modeling of Traffic Smoothness for Railway Track Closures in the Rail Network

  • Grzegorz KarońEmail author
Chapter
  • 909 Downloads
Part of the Studies in Systems, Decision and Control book series (SSDC, volume 87)

Abstract

This article presents a discussion of railway track section closures and loss of traffic. A method for rational planning and optimal coordination of track closures is introduced, along with estimations of traffic smoothness, including a few example calculations.

Keywords

Railway track closures Traffic smoothness Railway capacity System for assessment of track configuration (SOUT) 

References

  1. 1.
    Abrila M, Barbera F et al (2008) An assessment of railway capacity. Transp Res Part E Logistics Transp Rev 44(5):774–806. doi: 10.1016/j.tre.2007.04.001 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Baron K, Heinrich L, Woch J (1984) Methods and tools for planning and organization of railway track closures. Project COBiRTK nr 3144/16. Katowice (in Polish) Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Burdett RL, Kozan E (2006) Techniques for absolute capacity determination in railways. Transp Res Part B Methodol 40(8):616–632CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Carey M (1994) A model and strategy for train pathing with choice of lines, platforms and routes. Transp Res B 28:333–353CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Heinrich L (1986) The method of bypass routing for track closures. Mathematical modeling of transport—monograph. Cracow University of Technology, Cracow (in Polish)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Jin M, Zhang L (2011) Analyzing congestion and capacity impacts from disruptions to critical infrastructures in the rail network. Final report. The National Center for Intermodal TransportationGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Karoń G (2005) Algorithm of coordination of railway closures in transportation networks. PhD Dissertation, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (in Polish)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Karoń G (2003) Application supporting the coordination process of track closures. Scientific Journal of Silesian University of Technology. Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice. Series Transport. No. 1586(47), pp 335–344 (in Polish)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Karoń G (2003) Applications supporting the coordination process of track closures. Scientific Journal of Silesian University of Technology. Series Transport. Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice. No. 1604(48), pp 283–290 (in Polish)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Karoń G (2002) Coordination of track closures. Scientific Journal of Silesian University of Technology. Series Transport. Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice. No. 1562(44), pp 195–202 (in Polish)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Karoń G, Biliński Ł, Pawlicki J (2009) The influence of modern rolling stock and the modernization of the track on time train—computer simulation. In: Woch J, Janecki R (eds) Contemporary transport systems. Selected problems of theory and practice. Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, pp 53–66 (in Polish)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Karoń G, Firlejczyk G (2006) Estimation of expected traffic smoothness on railway section with computer train control system. Scientific Journal of Silesian University of Technology. Series Transport. Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice. No. 1721(62), pp 237–246 (in Polish)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Karoń G, Skrzypek M (2006) Actual method of train timetable construction. Scientific Journal of Silesian University of Technology. Series Transport. Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice. No. 1721(62), pp 247–256 (in Polish)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Kozan E, Burdett R (2011) A railway capacity determination model and rail access charging methodologies. Transp Plann Technol 28(1):27–45CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Lai YC, Barkan C (2011) Comprehensive decision support framework for strategic railway capacity planning. J Transp Eng 137(10):738–749Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Lai YC, Shih MC, Jong JC (2010) Railway capacity model and decision support process for strategic capacity planning. Transp Res Record J Transp Res Board 2197:19–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Lam WHK, Huang H-J (2002) Modeling and solving the dynamic user equilibrium route and departure time choice problem in network with queues. Transp Res B Methodol 36(3):253–273CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Liudvinanavicius L, Dailydka S, Sładkowski A (2015) New railway traffic control system possibilities. In: Sładkowski A (ed) Proceedings of VII international scientific conference. IV international symposium of young researchers. Silesian University of Technology. Faculty of Transport. Katowice, pp 341–350Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Mattsson LG (2007) Railway capacity and train delay relationships. Critical infrastructure. Springer, Berlin, pp 129–150Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Młyńczak J, Toruń A, Bester L (2016) European rail traffic management system (ERTMS). In: Sładkowski A, Pamuła W (eds) Intelligent transportation systems—problems and perspectives. Series: Studies in systems, decision and control, vol 32. Springer International Publishing Switzerland, pp 217–242Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Peña-Alcaraz M, Webster M, Ramos A (2011) An approximate dynamic programming approach for designing train timetables. ESD working paper series. ESD-WP-2011-11. Available: http://dspace.mit.edu/bitstream/ handle/1721.1/102831/esd-wp-2011-11.pdf?sequence=1
  22. 22.
    Pouryousef H, Lautala P, White T (2013) Review of capacity measurement methodologies; similarities and differences in the US and European railroads. Available: http://docs.trb.org/prp/13-4502.pdf
  23. 23.
    Pouryousef H, Lautala P (2015) Hybrid simulation approach for improving railway capacity and train schedules. J Rail Transp Plann Manag 5(4):211–224CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Railways closures guidance (2006) Department of Transport. Transport ScotlandGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Surma S (2010) Role and functions of a local control centre. In: Janecki R, Sierpiński G (eds) Contemporary transportation systems. Selected theoretical and practical problems. The development of transportation systems. Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, pp 207–212Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Wendler E (2007) The scheduled waiting time on railway lines. Transp Res Part B Methodol 41(2):148–158MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Woch J (1998) Shaping the traffic flows in dense transport networks. Szumacher Publishing, Kielce (in Polish)Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Woch J (2001) Tools of efficiency analysis and optimization of the rail network (South system—a description of the basic software). Publishing House of Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (in Polish)Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Woch J (1977) Project MK 122.11 system for assessment of track configuration. The Centre for Research and Technological Development Railway COBiRTK No. 3144/16, Katowice (in Polish)Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Yaghini M et al (2014) Capacity consumption analysis using heuristic solution method for under construction railway routes. Netw Spat Econ 14(3-4):317–333MathSciNetCrossRefzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Żochowska R, Karoń G (2016) ITS services packages as a tool for managing traffic congestion in cities. In: Sładkowski A, Pamuła W (eds) Intelligent transportation systems—problems and perspectives. Series: Studies in systems, decision and control, vol 32. Springer International Publishing Switzerland, pp 81–104Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Żochowska R (2015) Multicriteria decision support for planning of temporary traffic arrangement in urban network. (Monograph) Publishing House of Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (in Polish)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of TransportSilesian University of TechnologyKatowicePoland

Personalised recommendations