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Introduction: Masculinity, Modernity, Papua New Guinea

  • David Lipset
Chapter
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Part of the Culture, Mind, and Society book series (CMAS)

Abstract

This book focuses on dimensions of alienation among Murik men who live in rural and peri-urban communities in a new postcolonial state, Papua New Guinea (PNG). Four concepts that orient it are introduced: the sociology and anthropology of masculinity, modernity theory, a sociological and Lacanian view of alienation and a Bakhtinian notion of dialogue. An overview of institutional and rural aspects of men in the postcolonial state of PNG is presented. The main institutions in Murik society are then outlined as are summaries of each chapter.

Keywords

Trading Partner Moral Community Modern Subject Male Cult Empty Signifier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Lipset
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Minnesota Twin CitiesSt PaulUSA

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