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The Quest for an Emancipatory Peace

  • Gëzim Visoka
Chapter
Part of the Rethinking Peace and Conflict Studies book series (RCS)

Abstract

This concluding chapter offers a reappraisal and charts the necessary conditions for a more emancipatory form of peace to emerge in Kosovo. The proposed agenda for an emancipatory peace is situated in a delicate balance between the necessity for joint commitments to the state of Kosovo, dealing with the past through an emancipatory reconciliation process, and the promotion of people-centred security. The book concludes by asserting that grounds for emancipation in Kosovo are more likely to take place through self-emancipation and individual actions than organised and collective politics.

Keywords

Civil Society International Mission Transitional Justice Civil Society Group Joint Commitment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gëzim Visoka
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Law and GovernmentDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

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