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The Production of Industrial Cow’s Milk Curds

  • Caterina BaroneEmail author
  • Marcella Barbera
  • Michele Barone
  • Salvatore Parisi
  • Izabela Steinka
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

By the historical viewpoint, cheeses are the final product of a complex work starting from milk. This liquid substance has to be coagulated: as a result, a heterogeneous matter—curd—is precipitated from the original milk. The rough composition of this intermediate influences the chemical composition of the final cheese. For these reasons, the production of industrial curds should be studied with attention. Different systems are available at present, but the mail process concerns always the coagulation of the original milk and the production of readily available curds for immediate or subsequent use (near the same cheesemaker or in different locations).This chapter discusses the normal production of prepackaged and ready-to-use cow’s milk curds with several technological modifications for industrial purposes.

Keywords

Acidification Casein Coagulation Cooling Cow’s milk curd Cutting Draining Rennet Salt Starter culture 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caterina Barone
    • 1
    Email author
  • Marcella Barbera
    • 2
  • Michele Barone
    • 3
  • Salvatore Parisi
    • 4
  • Izabela Steinka
    • 5
  1. 1.Associazione “Componiamo il Futuro” (COIF) PalermoPalermoItaly
  2. 2.DEMETRA DepartmentUniversity of PalermoPalermoItaly
  3. 3.Associazione “Componiamo il Futuro” (COIF) PalermoPalermoItaly
  4. 4.Industrial Consultant, FSPCA PCQIPalermoItaly
  5. 5.Gdynia Maritime UniversityGdyniaPoland

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