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Introduction

  • Salih Cıngıllıoğlu
Chapter
  • 185 Downloads
Part of the Middle East Today book series (MIET)

Abstract

This chapter aims to familiarize the reader with the background to the research on which this book is based. The research explores the implementation of adult education in social movements, which in this case is an Islamic social movement, the Gülen Movement. The research not only delves into social movements as a subject matter of sociology but also examines the role of adult education in the individual and social transformation that takes place through a social movement. The answers to the following questions are sought. How are the followers of the Gülen Movement transformed as a result of being a participant of a social movement? What are the transformations experienced by the participants of the Gülen Movement?

Keywords

Social Movement Local Circle Transformative Learning Educational Aspect Turkish State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salih Cıngıllıoğlu
    • 1
  1. 1.SarajevoBosnia and Herzegovina

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