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Biodiversity as Support for Ecosystem Services and Human Wellbeing

  • Pedro PinhoEmail author
  • Marco Moretti
  • Ana Catarina Luz
  • Filipa Grilo
  • Joana Vieira
  • Leena Luís
  • Luís Miguel Rosalino
  • Maria Amélia Martins-Loução
  • Margarida Santos-Reis
  • Otília Correia
  • Patrícia Garcia-Pereira
  • Paula Gonçalves
  • Paula Matos
  • Ricardo Cruz de Carvalho
  • Rui Rebelo
  • Teresa Dias
  • Teresa Mexia
  • Cristina Branquinho
Chapter
Part of the Future City book series (FUCI, volume 7)

Introduction

Biodiversity in cities embodies two important relationships: on the one hand, it is strongly influenced and shaped by the urban environment, while on the other it underlies many ecosystem services (ES) that are essential for human wellbeing . These biodiversity-supported services are allocated through a city’s green infrastructure, and include, for example, the regulation of microclimate and air quality that is driven by trees and the cultural enrichment of urban landscapes by gardens. Forested areas are frequently regarded as hotspots for both biodiversity and ES, because adding trees to an ecosystem enriches its ecological structure – and thus its biodiversity. This effect is further boosted in large forested areas, with multiple tree species of different ages along with decaying wood .

The composition of species which reflects a city’s biodiversity is not the same as that found in the surrounding countryside or natural areas – because these species must cope with, and...

Keywords

Ecosystem Service Green Area Decay Wood Green Infrastructure Urban Green Space 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pedro Pinho
    • 1
    Email author
  • Marco Moretti
    • 2
  • Ana Catarina Luz
    • 3
  • Filipa Grilo
    • 3
  • Joana Vieira
    • 3
  • Leena Luís
    • 4
  • Luís Miguel Rosalino
    • 5
  • Maria Amélia Martins-Loução
    • 3
  • Margarida Santos-Reis
    • 3
  • Otília Correia
    • 3
  • Patrícia Garcia-Pereira
    • 3
  • Paula Gonçalves
    • 3
  • Paula Matos
    • 3
  • Ricardo Cruz de Carvalho
    • 3
  • Rui Rebelo
    • 3
  • Teresa Dias
    • 3
  • Teresa Mexia
    • 3
  • Cristina Branquinho
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Faculdade de Ciências & CERENA, ISTUniversidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal
  2. 2.Biodiversity and Conservation BiologySwiss Federal Research Institute WSLZürichSwitzerland
  3. 3.Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Faculdade de Ciências (cE3c, FCUL)Universidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal
  4. 4.Palaeoecology & Landscape Ecology, Institute for Biodiversity & Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED)University of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.CESAM & Departamento de BiologiaUniversidade de AveiroAveiroPortugal

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