Advertisement

Conclusion

  • Lorne Neudorf
Chapter
  • 314 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter compares the case studies of judicial independence in Malaysia and Pakistan. As observed by Professor Anja Seibert-Fohr, the comparison of judicial independence across legal systems stands to shed light on the legal principle more generally. This chapter therefore aspires to offer insight into the idea of an independent judiciary and how it is likely to take shape and work in different legal systems. The second part analyses and compares judicial independence in Malaysia and Pakistan in contrast with England by looking at the evolution of judicial independence and the contextual factors that can be seen to have influenced this process. The third and fourth parts evaluate the competing universal and pragmatic and context-sensitive theories of judicial independence by comparing the results observed to the results expected under each of the two theories. The fifth part suggests some broader implications and lessons learned in terms of future judicial independence studies and judicial reform projects.

Keywords

Legal System Model Rule Universal Theory Legal Power Judicial Independence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Chang HJ (2002) Kicking away the ladder: development strategy in historical perspective. Anthem Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  2. Council of Europe (1953) European Convention on Human RightsGoogle Scholar
  3. Dyzenhaus D (1997) The politics of deference: judicial review and democracy. In: Taggart M (ed) The province of administrative law. Hart Publishing, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  4. Frankenberg G (2012) Comparative constitutional law. In: Bussani M, Mattei U (eds) The Cambridge companion to comparative law. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  5. Glenn HP (2013) The cosmopolitan state. Oxford University Press, OxfordCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Glenn HP (2014) Legal traditions of the world: sustainable diversity in law. Oxford University Press, OxfordCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Goldsworthy (2012) Constitutional interpretation. In: Rosenfeld M, Sajó A (eds) The Oxford handbook of comparative constitutional law. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  8. Guarnieri C, Piana D (2012) Judicial independence and the rule of law: exploring the European experience. In: Shetreet S, Forsyth C (eds) The culture of judicial independence: conceptual foundations and practical challenges. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, LeidenGoogle Scholar
  9. Heard A (2014) Canadian constitutional conventions: the marriage of law & politics, 2nd edn. Oxford University Press, TorontoGoogle Scholar
  10. International Association of Judicial Independence and World Peace (2008) Mount Scopus International Standards of Judicial IndependenceGoogle Scholar
  11. Jackson VC (2012) Comparative constitutional law: methodologies. In: Rosenfeld M, Sajó A (eds) The Oxford handbook of comparative constitutional law. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  12. Jacobsohn GJ (2012) The formation of constitutional identities. In: Rosenfeld M, Sajó A (eds) The Oxford handbook of comparative constitutional law. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  13. Krygier M (2012) Rule of law. In: Rosenfeld M, Sajó A (eds) The Oxford handbook of comparative constitutional law. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  14. Larkins CM (1996) Judicial independence and democratization: a theoretical and conceptual analysis. Am J Comp Law 44:605Google Scholar
  15. Levinson S (2006) Identifying ‘independence’. Bost Univ Law Rev 86:1297Google Scholar
  16. MacDonald RA, Kong H (2012) Judicial independence as a constitutional virtue. In: Rosenfeld M, Sajó A (eds) The Oxford handbook of comparative constitutional law. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  17. Marshall G (1984) Constitutional conventions: the rules and forms of political accountability. Clarendon, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  18. McLachlin B (2005) Unwritten constitutional principles: what is going on? Speech delivered at the Lord Cooke Lecture. Available at http://www.fact.on.ca/judiciary/NewZeal.pdf. Accessed 26 Aug 2016
  19. Mydans S (2008) Malaysian blogger fights a system he perfected. Available at The New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/06/world/asia/06blogger.html. Accessed 26 Aug 2016
  20. Neudorf L (2015) Judicial independence: the judge as a third party to the dispute. Oxford Univ Comp Law Forum 2015:2Google Scholar
  21. Newberg PR (1995) Judging the state: courts and constitutional politics in Pakistan. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. North DC (1993) Economic performance through time. Lecture to the memory of Alfred Nobel. Available at http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/economics/laureates/1993/north-lecture.html. Accessed 26 Aug 2016
  23. North DC (2003) The role of institutions in economic development. United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Discussion Paper Series No. 2033.2Google Scholar
  24. Rashid NA (1978) The Malaysian Parliament. In: Suffian M, Lee HP, Trindade FA (eds) The constitution of Malaysia: its development, 1957–1977. Oxford University Press, Kuala LumpurGoogle Scholar
  25. Razak N (2011) Speech to the Commonwealth magistrates’ and judges’ conferenceGoogle Scholar
  26. Seibert-Fohr A (2012) Judicial independence – the normativity of an evolving transnational principle. In: Seibert-Fohr A (ed) Judicial independence in transition. Springer, HeidelbergCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Shapiro M (1986) Courts: a comparative and political analysis. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  28. Shapiro M (2004) Judicial review in developed democracies. In: Gloppen S, Gargarella R, Skaar E (eds) Democratization and the judiciary: the accountability function of courts in new democracies. Frank Cass Publishers, LondonGoogle Scholar
  29. Shetreet S (1985) Judicial independence: new conceptual dimensions and contemporary challenges. In: Shetreet S, Deschênes J (eds) Judicial independence: the contemporary debate. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  30. Stone Sweet A (2000) Governing with judges: constitutional politics in Europe. Oxford University Press, OxfordCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. The News (2014) No democracy can endure if a balance is not struck between freedom, security: CJP. Available at https://www.thenews.com.pk/archive/print/638709-no-democracy-can-endure-if-a-balance-is-not-struck-between-freedom,-security-cjp. Accessed 26 Aug 2016
  32. Thio (2006) Beyond the four walls in an age of transnational judicial conversations civil liberties, rights theories, and constitutional adjudication in Malaysia and Singapore. Columbia J Asian Law 19(2):428Google Scholar
  33. Tushnet M (2012) Constitution. In: Rosenfeld M, Sajó A (eds) The Oxford handbook of comparative constitutional law. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  34. Wu MA (1999) The Malaysian legal system, 2nd edn. Longman Malaysia, Petaling JayaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorne Neudorf
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of LawThompson Rivers UniversityKamloopsCanada

Personalised recommendations