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Severe Iodine Deficiency

  • Eduardo A. PretellEmail author
  • Chandrakant Pandav
  • Regional Co-ordinator South Asia Iodine Global Network
Chapter
  • 632 Downloads

Abstract

Severe iodine deficiency is defined as a goiter prevalence greater than 30 % and/or a median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) of less than 20 μg/L in a given population or defined geographical area. The adaptive processes of the thyroid gland may be unable to compensate for this degree of iodine deficiency, leading to manifestations which include endemic goiter, hypothyroidism, obstetric complications, intellectual impairment, and cretinism. However, the manifestations of severe iodine deficiency have decreased globally primarily due to widespread coverage with adequately iodized salt.

Keywords

Iodine Endemic goiter Cretinism Iron deficiency Vitamin A deficiency Reproduction 

Abbreviations

IDA

Iron deficiency anemia

IDD

Iodine deficiency disorders

IGN

Iodine Global Network

PAHO

Pan American Health Organization

SF

Serum ferritin

T3

Triiodothyronine

TGR

Total goiter rate

T4

Thyroxine

TSH

Thyroid stimulation hormone

UIC

Urinary iodine concentration

WHO

World Health Organization

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eduardo A. Pretell
    • 1
    Email author
  • Chandrakant Pandav
    • 2
  • Regional Co-ordinator South Asia Iodine Global Network
  1. 1.Faculty of Medicina, Peruvian University Cayetano HerediaIodine Global Network (IGN)San Isidro, Lima 27Peru
  2. 2.Centre for Community MedicineAll India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New DelhiNew DelhiIndia

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