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There and Back Again – Andrew Booth, a British Computer Pioneer, and his Interactions with US and Other Contemporaries

  • Roger G. JohnsonEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 491)

Abstract

This paper explores the interchanges between Andrew Booth, an early British computer pioneer and contemporary US and other pioneers. The paper records how funding from the US Rockefeller Foundation supported Andrew Booth’s research work in the UK and allowed him to refine his ideas on computer design by visiting US pioneers each year from 1946 to 1948. This led to the construction of an electronic drum, the world’s first successful demonstration of a rotating storage device connected to a computer, to his pioneering work on natural language processing and finally and most notably to his invention of the Booth hardware multiplier which is the basis of the multiplier used in billions of chips each year.

Keywords

Andrew Booth APERC HEC Magnetic drum Booth multiplier British Tabulating Machine Ltd 

References

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computer Science, Birkbeck CollegeLondon UniversityLondonUK

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