Advertisement

The Birth of Artificial Intelligence: First Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Paris in 1951?

  • Herbert BrudererEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 491)

Abstract

The 1956 Dartmouth conference is often considered as the cradle of artificial intelligence. There is a controversy on its origin. Some historians of computing believe that Turing or Zuse were the fathers of machine intelligence. However, the first working chess-playing automaton was developed by Torres Quevedo by 1912. Moreover, there was a large and important (but forgotten) European conference on computing and human thinking in Paris in 1951.

Keywords

Paris conference on artificial intelligence Spanish chess automaton by Torres Quevedo Turing’s impact 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The author is grateful for discussions with Jürgen Schmidhuber.

References

  1. 1.
    Bruderer, H.: Meilensteine der Rechentechnik. Zur Geschichte der Mathematik und der Informatik (Milestones in Analog and Digital Computing. Contributions to the History of Mathematics and Information Technology), de Gruyter, Berlin/Boston, 850 p (2015)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bruderer, H.: Computing history outside UK and USA: some selected landmarks from continental Europe. In: Communications of the ACM (forthcoming)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bruderer, H.: Early history of computing in Switzerland: discovery of rare devices, unknown documents, and scarcely known facts. In: IEEE Annals of the History of Computing (2017, forthcoming)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bruderer, H.: Konrad Zuse und die Schweiz. Wer hat den Computer erfunden? (Konrad Zuse and Switzerland. Who invented the computer?), 250 p. de Gruyter, Berlin/Boston (2012)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Chauchard, P.: La commande centrale de la machine nerveuse. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 531–536. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Couffignal, L.: Quelques analogiques nouvelles entre structures de machines à calculer et structures cérébrales. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 549–562. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris, (1953)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Delpech, L.: Perspectives psychologiques et machines à penser. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 539–548. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Fessard, A.: Sur un, défaut“ propre à la machine nerveuse. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 517–528. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Gastaut, H.: Les machines à calculer et le cerveau humain. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 447–459. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Culloch, W.S.M., Lettvin, J.Y., Pitts, W.H., Dell, P.C.: Une comparaison entre les machines à calculer et le cerveau. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 425–443. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Pérès, J. (ed.): Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, vol. XIX, 570 p. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), 581 p. Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Rutishauser, H., Speiser, A.P., Stiefel, E.: Programmgesteuerte digitale Rechengeräte (elektronische Rechenmaschinen), 102 p. Birkhäuser, Basel (1951)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Torres-Quevedo, G.: Les travaux de l’École espagnole sur l’automatisme. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 361–381. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Torres-Quevedo, G.: Présentation des appareils de Leonardo Torres-Quevedo. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 383–406. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Walter, W.G.: Réalisation mécanique de modèles de structure cérébrale. In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 407–420. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Wiener, N.: Les machines à calculer et la forme (Gestalt). In: Pérès, J. (ed.) Les machines à calculer et la pensée humaine, Paris, 8–13 janvier 1951, Colloques internationaux du Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Nr. 37, pp. 461–463. Editions du Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Paris (1953)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Zemanek, H.: Central European prehistory of computing. In: Metropolis, N.C., Howlett, J., Rota, G.-C. (eds.) A History of Computing in the Twentieth Century, A collection of essays, pp. 587–609. Academic press, New York (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ETH ZurichZurichSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations