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A Historiography of College Students 30 Years After Helen Horowitz’s Campus Life

  • Michael S. HevelEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 32)

Abstract

This chapter examines the historical scholarship on college students in the United States, using Helen Horowitz’s (Campus life: Undergraduate cultures from the end of the eighteenth century to the present. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1987) Campus Life, now celebrating its 30th anniversary, as a scholarly divider. The chapter begins by considering the formative scholarship related to the history of college students that emerged in the nineteenth century and stretched well into the twentieth century. Next, it considers the growth of historical studies that were a scholarly response to the turbulence on campus in the 1960s and early 1970s, before highlighting the contributions of Helen Horowitz’s now classic Campus Life, the only work that has offered a broad history of college students. Campus Life paid particular attention to how students’ gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class shaped their experiences over time. The last half of the chapter considers the significant expansion of historical research in the subsequent three decades. Recent historians have largely chosen to provide focused studies of specific populations of students, including White, African America, Asian American, Latino, Native American and LGBT students and students with disabilities. Moving forward, historians must continue to study student populations underrepresented in the historical record while also synthesizing those areas well covered by recent historical scholarship.

Keywords

African American students Asian American students Campus Life College students Frederick Rudolph Helen Horowitz History of students Latino students LGBT student Mass higher education Men’s higher education Native American students Student activism Student diversity Students with disabilities White students Women’s higher education 

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA

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