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Philanthropic Foundations’ Social Agendas and the Field of Higher Education

  • Cassie L. BarnhardtEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 32)

Abstract

Today there are approximately 68,000 private independent foundations that contribute less than 3 % of the total annual revenue to the field of higher education. These groups aspire to use their patronage to transform and reform the structure and practices of higher education, such that their vision for American society takes hold. Since society is once again in an era of mega-foundation activity, this synthesis considers the evidence describing how private foundations have pursued their social agendas to shape the field of higher education.

Keywords

Private foundations Social agendas Mobilizing resources Foundation patronage Channeling Higher education Big foundations Mega-foundations Conservative foundations Progressive foundations Radical reform foundations Neoliberal foundations Strategic philanthropy Nonprofit sector Think tanks Private resources in education Venture philanthropy Philanthro-capitalism Development in higher education Grant-making in higher education Philanthro-policy making 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational Policy and Leadership StudiesUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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