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The Impact of College Students’ Interactions with Faculty: A Review of General and Conditional Effects

  • Young K. KimEmail author
  • Linda J. Sax
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 32)

Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of the literature relevant to the effects of student-faculty interaction among undergraduate students, including general and conditional effects, and proposes a research agenda that will improve our understanding of the theoretical and practical implications of the impact of college students’ interactions with faculty. We begin our review by examining theoretical frameworks used in the current research on the impact of student-faculty interaction. We then highlight the methodology used in these studies, both quantitative and qualitative. Next, we discuss empirical findings on the impact of student-faculty interaction. Finally, we offer conceptual and methodological recommendations for future research on this topic.

Keywords

Student-faculty interaction College students General effects Conditional effects Direct effects Indirect effects Reciprocal effects College impact Student outcomes Quantitative research Qualitative research College student surveys 

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Higher EducationAzusa Pacific UniversityAzusaUSA
  2. 2.Graduate School of Education & Information StudiesUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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