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The Privileged Journey of Scholarship and Practice

  • Daryl G. SmithEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 32)

Abstract

This chapter provides reflections and summaries for Smith’s career in higher education including 21 years as a college administrator and 29 as a faculty member. The chapter synthesizes Smith’s research and the personal journey of her career. In addition, the chapter looks at the important role of associations, accreditation, and foundations in the work of higher education and the opportunities provided for research and evaluation. Embedded in the chapter are perspectives on building institutional capacity for diversity, faculty diversity, institutional change, the role of institutional identities, and bridging research and practice in higher education.

Keywords

Diversity Building capacity Institutional change Institutional identity Faculty diversity Bridging research and practice Women’s colleges Special purpose institutions HBCUs Diversity in leadership 

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Claremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA

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