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Real Abolition

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Abstract

Truly abolishing slavery will require imposing higher costs on enslavers than the benefits they receive from enslaving others. Here, Wright argues that slavery creates negative externalities that swamp the marginal benefits of enslaver profitability. Policymakers should try to reduce slavery for economic as well as moral reasons. Slavery persists despite being illegal because antislavery laws are not strenuously enforced in most countries. Buying slaves will not end slavery. Reducing poverty can help by reducing supply. Consumer boycotts can also have a positive impact in specific situations. The most effective antislavery policy imposes heavy costs on enslavers, most of the proceeds of which are invested in freed slaves so that they become productive members of the economy and hence less vulnerable to further exploitation. Finally, new technologies may help reduce demand for certain types of slaves, even sex slaves.

Keywords

Negative Externality Conviction Rate Microfinance Institution Consumer Boycott Smoking Tobacco Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Augustana UniversitySioux FallsUSA

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