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That Which Is Unseen I: Slavery’s Pollution

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Abstract

Slavery creates large amounts of pollution, or negative externalities, that greatly exceed in value the marginal economic benefits of enslaver profitability. In this chapter, Wright examines the hidden costs of slavery, the pollution that enslaving others causes to the slaves themselves and their immediate families, to slaves’ places of origin, and, ironically, to enslavers themselves. Chapter 6 also examines the negative effects of slavery on population growth, non-slave laborers and businesses, and economic development, including education, infrastructure, and technology levels, agricultural productivity, and the environment. Finally, it examines the negative effects of slavery on the distribution of wealth and income and the quality of political governance and institutions.

Keywords

Police Officer Negative Externality Slave System Slave Trade Deadweight Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Augustana UniversitySioux FallsUSA

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