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Slavery Resilient

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Abstract

In response to the great emancipations of the nineteenth century, slavery transmogrified into various forms of bound or unfree labor. In this chapter, Wright surveys the splintering of slavery into various forms of bonded or coerced labor, including debt peonage, indentured servitude, and convict labor, across the globe since the great emancipations of the nineteenth century until today. He describes how chattel slaves were in many instances replaced by forms of labor nearly as unfree and how that led to the “white slavery” of the early twentieth century as well as the “new slavery” of the early Third Millennium.

Keywords

Wage Laborer Indenture Laborer Indenture Servant Competitive Wage Debt Bondage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Augustana UniversitySioux FallsUSA

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