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A Not So Peculiar Institution

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Abstract

Slavery is a ubiquitous and almost universal form of labor across the globe from prehistory to the nineteenth century. This chapter surveys legal forms slavery across the globe from prehistory to the great emancipations of the nineteenth century. It notes the ubiquity of the institution since the formation of complex societies, if not before, and suggests that most humans alive today are descended from both slaves and enslavers. Finally, the chapter questions the notion that some forms of slavery are benign.

Keywords

Slave System Slave Trade Northwest Coast African Slave Free People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Augustana UniversitySioux FallsUSA

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