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Fukushima-1 and Chernobyl: Comparison of Radioactivity Release and Contamination

  • Tetsuji ImanakaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination are compared between the Fukushima-1 accident and the Chernobyl accident. The area of ground severely contaminated around Chernobyl is more than ten times larger than around Fukushima-1. The composition of ground contamination is also different between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1. Other than radiocesiums (134Cs and 137Cs), radionuclides such as 95Z, 95Nb, 103Ru and 140La contribute significantly radiation exposure during the first year in Chernobyl, while their contribution is negligible in Fukushima-1. Cumulative radiation exposure during the first year per initial 137Cs deposition of 1 MBq m−2 is 500 mGy and 63 mGy in Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. For 30 year, they are 970 mGy and 500 mGy in Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively.

Keywords

Fukushima-1 accident Chernobyl accident Radioactivity release Radioactivity contamination Radiation exposure 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Reactor InstituteKyoto UniversityOsakaJapan

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