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A Cartographic Mapping Practice: Environmental Education, the Material/Discursive, and a New Materialist Praxis

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Part of the Curriculum Studies Worldwide book series (CSWW)

Abstract

“A Cartographic Mapping Practice” serves as a theoretical literature review, a tracing of the stories that make up and shape environmental education (EE), their modes of storytelling, as well as an inquiry into narrative practices of normalization. The chapter illustrates a mapping praxis, a cartography, attempting to move away from EE as a practice of teaching “about” nature, by understanding how the current capitalistic, hyper-modern society has created complex modes of control, requiring new analytical tools to deconstruct, critique, and outmaneuver their coercive powers. Gathering up the discursive practices of the post-structuralists, the chapter explores New Materialist theories hoping to find alternative figurations and schemes of representation to account for the multiple complex locations and overlapping territories of teaching, learning, and research.

Keywords

Cartography New materialism Post-structuralism Environmental education Story 

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© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA

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