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Formation of Industrial Complexes in South Korea in the 1960s and 1970s: Reconsidering Entrepreneurial State in Asia

  • Eugene K. Choi
Chapter
Part of the Central Issues in Contemporary Economic Theory and Policy book series (CICETP)

Abstract

South Korea in the 1950s was one of the least developed economies in the world. The state-led industrialization for survival began from the 1960s, and since then, a distinct catch-up model for rapid economic growth was developed. The protagonist in the rise of the entrepreneurial State was an emergent community of technocrats. The technocrats, capable of administration and technology management, were the strategic architects of designing, planning, and executing the national innovation system. This introductory study examines the nature and role of the technocrats in the case of the evolution of Korea Industrial Complex Corporation (KICOX) since 1974.

Keywords

Entrepreneurial State South Korea Industrial complex Kicox Technocrats 

JEL Classification

L26 L32 L52 L53 N45 O20 O25 O38 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene K. Choi
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Technology ManagementRitsumeikan UniversityKyotoJapan

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