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Conclusions

  • Rolf Loeber
  • Wesley G. Jennings
  • Lia Ahonen
  • Alex R. Piquero
  • David P. Farrington
Chapter
  • 264 Downloads
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Criminology book series (BRIEFSCRIMINOL)

Abstract

This chapter provides a review the results of the girls’ criminal careers, including comparisons with the criminal careers of boys in the PYS. Inherently due to space limitations, we do not touch on many aspects that are relevant for the direction and outcome of girls’ criminal careers. For that reason, we frame the results in a larger context of gender differences shown in other PGS publications and other longitudinal studies. We also review pathways to serious forms of offending, early problem manifestations in childhood, other negative consequences other than delinquency outcomes, and knowledge of risk and protective factors. We then highlight the extent to which findings on judicial and extra-judicial programs are shown to reduce girls’ delinquency. The combined findings on girls’ delinquency careers and their risk/protective factors are then discussed in the context of salient theories and their implications for practice. We conclude with a review of the important policy implications of the preceding results.

Keywords

Self-report offending Official records Criminal careers Developmental Life-course Trajectories Gender 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rolf Loeber
    • 1
  • Wesley G. Jennings
    • 2
  • Lia Ahonen
    • 1
    • 3
  • Alex R. Piquero
    • 4
  • David P. Farrington
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of CriminologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.Örebro UniversityÖrebroSweden
  4. 4.University of Texas at Dallas Criminology ProgramRichardsonUSA
  5. 5.Institute of CriminologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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