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Gender Differences: Comparisons with Males in the Pittsburgh Youth Study

  • Rolf Loeber
  • Wesley G. Jennings
  • Lia Ahonen
  • Alex R. Piquero
  • David P. Farrington
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Criminology book series (BRIEFSCRIMINOL)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on comparisons of self-reported offending and criminal career parameters between the PGS females and the male participants from the Youngest and Oldest cohorts from the Pittsburgh Youth Study (PYS). Specifically, direct comparisons are made for self-reported offending prevalence, frequency, persistence/continuity, age of onset, desistance, career duration, recidivism, chronic offending, and trajectories of offending. The results are mostly in line with prior studies, showing lower prevalence and frequency, shorter career length, higher desistance, and lower prevalence of recidivist and chronic offenders among the girls than the boys. Trajectory analyses indicated three trajectories for girls compared to four for boys, with the highest rate (offending) trajectory observed in boys not being present in girls.

Keywords

Official offending Self-reported offending Trajectories Criminology Policy 

References

  1. Jennings, W. G., Loeber, R., Pardini, D., Piquero, A., & Farrington, D. P. (2016). Offending from childhood to young adulthood: Recent results from the Pittsburgh Youth Study. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. Nagin, D. S. (2010). Group-based trajectory modeling: An overview. In A. R. Piquero & D. Weisburd (Eds.), Handbook of quantitative criminology (pp. 53–67). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rolf Loeber
    • 1
  • Wesley G. Jennings
    • 2
  • Lia Ahonen
    • 1
    • 3
  • Alex R. Piquero
    • 4
  • David P. Farrington
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of CriminologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.Örebro UniversityÖrebroSweden
  4. 4.University of Texas at Dallas Criminology ProgramRichardsonUSA
  5. 5.Institute of CriminologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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