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Vocational Education and Training (VET) and the Transition of Young Women and Men to the Labour Market in Middle-Income Countries: A Comparative Analysis Based on International Labour Organization (ILO) Surveys in Jamaica, Jordan, Peru, Tunisia, Ukraine, Vietnam and Zambia

  • Valentina BarcucciEmail author
  • Lea Zanola
  • Michael Axmann
Chapter
Part of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (TVET, volume 24)

Abstract

The ILO works with constituents on improving transitions from education and training to decent work. Understanding young people’s pathways is thus essential for the ILO to provide policy recommendations related to VET and skills development in general.

The following pages draw from findings of School-to-Work Transition Surveys (SWTS) conducted by the ILO in 2012–2013 in 28 countries. The seven middle-income countries discussed here are Jamaica, Jordan, Peru, Tunisia, Ukraine, Vietnam, and Zambia. The surveys targeted a nationally representative sample of young people in the age bracket 15–29, and collected data on the educational backgrounds and the labour market outcomes of respondents.

In particular, this brief report focuses on the labour market outcomes of young people who have completed secondary or post-secondary VET, as opposed to secondary academic education, or university and post-graduate studies (together referred to as ‘post-secondary academic education’ in this report).

With the available evidence, no causal relationship can be claimed at this stage between type of education and labour market outcomes, or between specific characteristics of VET systems and successful transitions of graduates to decent work.

The data in the survey did not distinguish between work-based learning or school-based learning alone or a combination of both in VET. So no statements can be made, for example, about the usefulness of quality apprenticeships, which combine both learning types, in the transition of young women and men into the labour markets of these seven middle-income countries.

However, the findings represent an important starting point to orient future research on the role of education in determining young people’s transitions to the labour market.

Keywords

International Labour Organization Labour Market Outcome Academic Education Informal Employment Academic Track 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valentina Barcucci
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lea Zanola
    • 1
  • Michael Axmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Employment Policy DepartmentInternational Labour Organization (ILO)Geneva 22Switzerland

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